Discover

The Opportunity

Fredericton, NB
Science and Research
Student
Student / Internship
$17 / hour

The Aquatic Technician for the Nashwaak Watershed Association Inc. (NWAI) will be responsible for assisting with culvert assessments, habitat assessments, regular water quality monitoring and data collection, riparian restoration planting & management. The Aquatic Technician will use digital technology skills to input, analyze, organize, create, and communicate information. They will use digital technology for report-writing, social media posts and other documentation as requested. The fieldwork components all involve digital technology involved with culvert assessments and entering data for water quality monitoring.

In addition to these tasks, the aquatic technician may also be asked to assist with or facilitate educational outreach programs, landowner consultation, and social media communications. The Aquatic Technician will communicate efficiently and professionally with clients (watershed participants). They will assist in representing the organization at external events, and be active in the planning, development, and implementation of NWAI sponsored events. They will represent the association at special events in rural communities in our watershed.

The Aquatic Technician will be supervised by the Conservation Coordinator. The student will be provided with an orientation period lasting three days. Depending on the activities undertaken, all the students work will be accompanied by another staff person.

What you'll do

Responsibilities

  • Physical restoration work (dam/debris removal, tree planting, rain garden installation)
  • Field work in various weather conditions (rain, heat, cold) and terrain (forest, wetland, streams)
  • Fish habitat and watercourse connectivity assessment
  • Water quality monitoring using various environmental parameters (pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen, etc.)
  • Scientific data entry on field sheets and computer
  • Plan, develop and deliver public outreach and education programs along with other staff
  • Equipment maintenance
  • Other office and field work, as required

What you'll need

Qualifications

  • Enrolled or completed a Diploma / Certificate from a Technical College or enrolled in a university degree in environmental science, biology or related discipline
  • Excellent written, technical reporting and communication skills.
  • Proficient with Microsoft Office Suite and database entry.
  • A positive and enthusiastic attitude, willingness to learn and the ability to work independently
  • Ability to develop positive working relationships in a team environment.
  • A valid driver's license.
  • Enjoy the outdoors, as fieldwork will likely comprise approximately 90% of the work week;
  • Be comfortable working in/around water.
  • Offers of employment for safety-sensitive positions involving fieldwork are contingent upon candidates being able to perform key physical tasks of the job as described in the job posting and interview. This may include the ability to work in a variety of environmental conditions, such as remote or isolated areas, working alone, and in inclement weather (within safe and reasonable limits).

We're looking for

Core Skills

Tree Planting Report Writing Public Speaking Community Engagement Community Outreach Education Program Development Aquatic Ecology Biology Scientific Writing Computer Skills

A little bit about us

Nashwaak Watershed Association

The Nashwaak Watershed Association was established in 1995 as a not-for-profit organization. Our organization restores land that can protect river water quality and we engage people on the use of its importance.

Vision
We envision people caring for a clean, healthy, and beautiful Nashwaak River watershed that supports and connects people and wildlife for years to come.

Mission
To promote, conserve, and restore the Nashwaak ecosystem by using science-based methods, community collaboration, and advocacy for the watershed and its inhabitants.

To learn more visit our website: www.nashwaakwatershed.ca or find us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Are you interested?

Work With Us

This summer student position is funded from early May until early September, most likely supported by SEED or Canada Summer Jobs.

The Nashwaak Watershed Association was established in 1995 as an environmental not-for-profit organization. Our mission is to promote, conserve, and restore the Nashwaak ecosystem by using science-based methods, community collaboration, and advocacy for the watershed and its inhabitants. The Nashwaak river is a 110km tributary of the Wolastoq (Saint John) River. It is acknowledged as an integral component of aquatic diversity and is listed by the Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada as an index river for species-at-risk Atlantic salmon. The watershed is home to 38 species of mammal, 15 species of amphibian, 7 species of reptile, 211 confirmed species of breeding bird, 21-30 species of fish, and 7 species of freshwater mussel. However, this diversity of plants and animals is threatened by habitat loss and fragmentation, pollution, and climate change. At least 20 species of animals and 6 species of plants are listed as Species-at-Risk.

Our organization has an exemplary history in watershed protection and restoration. Over the past 10 years alone we have improved water quality by restoring over 40 hectares of riparian floodplain forests, improved aquatic connectivity by opening over 55 km2 of previously inaccessible habitat, connecting the community to their watershed through outreach initiatives, and collecting a scientifically robust water quality dataset. Healthy watersheds provide many ecosystem services for human health, ecological health, and economic health including nutrient cycling, carbon sequestration, erosion and flood control, biodiversity support, soil development, wildlife corridors, water storage and filtration, food, timber, and recreation, as well as reduced susceptibility to invasive species and the effects of climate change. These services are vital to our social, environmental, and economic welfare but are usually under-valued when it comes to land use decisions